Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Discussion

I've starting walking my dog at a brisk pace for 30-45 minutes. Is this enough to help me? I don't have time for going to the gym, nor money to join one. Running is out of the question. I think my knees would explode. Cycling is not out of the question, but I think my wife would worry herself to death with me sharing the road with cars. I basically need something quick and easy to keep up, that's free. Walking the dog seemed to fit the bill. It's good for me and Lucy (the dog). I just don't know if it is going to help me or not.
When I was losing my weight I had just had a baby and all I did was walk. I wasn't about to leave my baby and hit the gym, lol. So, in the sling he went and we went walking everywhere, we both loved it. It worked for me.
I walk when I can work it into my schedule and not only do I enjoy it, I really believe in it's weight loss benefits. And I generally only do about a 30 minute walk. The most weight I ever lost was on a low-cal diet about 12 years ago and I was in a job where I could walk about an hour a day. Now, of course I gained all that weight back cause I couldn't maintain the low-cal without starving to death and walking too. But LC is a different story. I think LC and walking are the ideal blend.

Walking is easy on the body, unlike running. It doesn't take any special equipment. There are no fees or membership costs. Even if it's bad weather I can always go to one of the malls and walk for free. And I just love the time it gives you to get away from things and clear your mind in the fresh air. The whole experience is just relaxing to me. And of course, it gets your metabolism up and has numerous other benefits as well. It's always time well spent, IMHO.
I love walking for conditioning, stress relief, and endurance. But weight lifting is what helps best for fat loss, strength building, and higher calorie-burning. Do what you can and do it consistently.
Walking is great when you are starting out but there are lots of exercises you can do at home with little or no equipment. The biggest loser last night gave lots of examples on how you could exercise without a gym. Doing push ups against a wall are great for upper body strength as you get stronger you can change to push-ups on your knees and the eventually to full push ups. You can do stomach crunches, knee pulls, bicycling legs while on your back, again all with no equipment and easy for beginners. When you want to start lifting weights use canned food or bottles of water. If you have a little money to spend invest in a set of elastic bands which are versatile & portable, these usually come with diagrams of exercises which help mobility & strength. The most important step you have already done and that is just to get moving. Keep up the good work!
Hey, I'm also one of the "walking is great" believers. And Patti, you really couldn't have said it any better. You are so right. I have a "bosu ball" which is this half globe thing and you can do all kinds of things on it. Also, cans work great. Pushups can be done in a million diff. ways. I also do handstands against a wall and it is FABULOUS for body strength. You just want to make sure you don't cave or dump in your lower back when you do it. There's nothing like moving. and as Ron said, it's not hard on your body like other exercise and you can do it in any weather. I used to run but I prefer not to have a compacted body pounded down with each step! Makes you shorter a lot faster.

My husband has a friend who is an orthopedic surgeon and he says whenever he sees people running, he knows his business is going to get even better.
I also have asthma and nothing seems to getting it going like running. I have to walk for long periods to feel like I've done something, but I don't have to respiratory backlash that I get with running.

I've also heard (cant' remember from where) that short strenuous workouts just burn sugars, but long workouts burn sugar at the beginning and fat toward the end.

Used to do pushups for fun... yes. I thought it was odd then too. I'd see how many I could do with out stopping. Then I'd do them on one arm until I couldn't do them anymore. Once I get my weight down, I'll probably start doing them again, along with some crunches, though I could do the crunches now. I think I'm going to try to get the walking thing down pat first.
all I have been able to work into my schedule is walking....during lunch at work...

82 pounds lost so far...

walking is certainly a GREAT place to start! one day I will work in resistance training...slow burn...or something like that...but for now...walking is all I can squeeze in....

edited to add:...I also have asthma
I've had asthma almost my whole life. I get kind of stupid about it sometimes. My wife has to make me do something about it when I start wheezing, sometimes. Anything can bring it on. The worst is a hard sneeze. I hate sneezing. When I was a swimmer the only time it bothered me was when I would run. I'm hoping that losing this weight will make me less symptomatic.
Another big fan of walking here. I don't walk primarily for exercise, but for pleasure; it's a hobby (we call it rambling here). I'm fortunate enough to have some lovely countryside on my doorstep, and I just go out and lose myself in it (not literally, you understand ). I go out walking with my wife when possible. We use proper walking boots, and thick socks, etc. It's not hilly round here, but occasionally the terrain can still be challenging, and that's half the fun. So is exploring places you have never been before, and discovering hidden beauty spots.

Swimming and cycling are also great (pity about the traffic worries), and pretty safe (from a physiological point of view) for a heavier person.


Enjoy whatever do do, and do whatever you enjoy.
For me, walking a slower speed up an incline made a huge difference. I was able to walk at an incline of 5 for half of the speed and burn twice the calories as a joint-pain-inducing twice as fast on a flat plane.

Since it takes more work to move a mass up an incline, you will find greater benefit in slowing 'er down and taking 'er up a ramp.
I used to hate inclines, but they're not so bad once you get used to them. But I do like my spin classes too which will give you quite a workout.
Quote:I've had asthma almost my whole life.

You can try supplementing with vitamin D, low levels have been implicated in Asthma.

Is your asthma better or worse with low carb and which plan are you using?
I walk every day for an hour on my treadmill and/or outside (super sunny Seattle here

I enjoy it and download Jimmy's podcasts to my iPod. Time flies when I'm absorbed into a podcast...of course, music is great for those non-podcast days.

~Danielle
Try sprint walking intervals. Walk as fast as you can till you begin to feel out of breath. Slow down till your breath slows down. Do the cycle again and again and the next thing you know you're walking less than half as long and getting a better workout.

I'm also a big fan of free squats. Check these ladies out:
http://media.crossfit.com/cf-video/Cross...Squats.wmv
You can get one awesome workout in 4 minutes, huh?

Notice the keys to making free squats work without injury. Head up, chest high, feet wide, toes out, sit back into it, knees track straight towards toes but never past them. Next rainy day when you can't walk the dog, give them a try. But work up to this level slowly. Two or three twenty second sets at a time.
I started as a runner by walking, and walking fast ! One of my running buddies and new-to-low-carb friends is asmatic - she just is tuned in enough to know whether she should jog or walk. Funny, but I've gotten back to adding a day of walking to my usual weekly running routine. THAT's when I'm sore ! It's a different set of muscles, so now I realize that I need to walk too ! I know plenty of people who have become very fit by walking, and there is NO way to measure how good it is for the soul. If it works for you, keep walking !
I used to be a die hard calorie counter. I found I could consume more calories and still lose weight if I walked/ran a lot. If I weightlifted and/or did Tae-bo, I couldn't add in any calories and maintain/or lose weight. Yet, the weight lifting and the Tae-bo seemed to firm up my body more. One of the reasons I ran a marathon was to be able to eat. At almost 5' 4" and small-boned, if I wasn't walking/running I could eat only 1200 calories a day to even be able to maintain 120 pounds. If I walked 5 miles a day, I could eat 1700 calories a day.

Yet, I'm not sure how walking/running affects low-carb and weight loss. I now eat between 2000 and 2500 calories a day and weigh 117. I run, but only 20 miles a week. In January, I'm going to really start adding the miles on. If all goes well, I'll be running 20 miles in one day some time in April. I'll see if running 35 to 40 miles a week affects weight loss or not, on a low-carb diet.

Some people think sprinting/interval training causes more weight loss than walking. I never have had this experience. Sprinting/interval training does cause my thighs to become extremely muscular, but I don't lose weight. Losing weight seems to be determined by the amount of miles I finish. It doesn't seem to matter if I walk or run those miles. I just prefer to run those miles. I love a runner's high.
I love walking. My dog is my walking buddy too. He’s a great workout partner. Always eager to exercise and never forgets when it’s time to walk. In fact, I can’t even say the word “walk” around here (we have to spell it out) or he goes nuts.

But lately I’ve come to realize that though it certainly doesn’t hurt, I don’t think it’s all that beneficial for weight loss. I think diet is almost everything for me when it comes to weight loss. If I walk for 30 minutes, I burn somewhere between 100-150 extra calories. It’s a lot easier to NOT eat an oz of cheese.

I will always be a walker though. It helps me relax and stay motivated on my diet (the BIGGEST benefit) and in general gives me a better overall feeling of well being. But I just don’t think it directly effects my body composition all that much.

Now, lifting weights is a different story. Though I haven’t noticed it helping me lose weight, it definitely helps me gain muscle. It also gives me such a rush. On days I lift, I feel awesome, think more clearly, and sleep better. I love lifting weights. If I was in your shoes, I’d consider purchasing a use pair of adjustable dumbbells (like powerblocks) and a bench off of craigslist. A lot cheaper than joining a gym and all you really need. Plus, if you decide you hate it, you can always resell and get your money back so it's pretty much a no risk investment.
Hogsfan Wrote:I love lifting weights. If I was in your shoes, I’d consider purchasing a use pair of adjustable dumbbells (like powerblocks) and a bench off of craigslist. A lot cheaper than joining a gym and all you really need. Plus, if you decide you hate it, you can always resell and get your money back so it's pretty much a no risk investment.
A bench? Why bother? Just a big ugly piece of furniture that lets you do bench presses which resemble no useful real world movement. (Ok, it would be useful if you ever had to lift a truck off you that had happened to fall on you as you lay resting on your back, but that moment is SO rare it's not worth training for.)
Do overhead pressing instead.

The PowerBlocks are totally the way to go. Don't buy the PowerBlock knockoffs that are all full of junky cheap plastic that won't last. Get the originals with the full metal plates and the wicked strong Lexan handle. Built for a lifetime! The Classic set is 45 lbs per hand for $279. The Sport 5 set is 50 lbs per hand for $299. One piece of strength gear and you're done... unless you need more than 50 lbs per hand, then go get an Oly bar 310 lb set.
Ben Fury Wrote:
Hogsfan Wrote:I love lifting weights. If I was in your shoes, I’d consider purchasing a use pair of adjustable dumbbells (like powerblocks) and a bench off of craigslist. A lot cheaper than joining a gym and all you really need. Plus, if you decide you hate it, you can always resell and get your money back so it's pretty much a no risk investment.
A bench? Why bother? Just a big ugly piece of furniture that lets you do bench presses which resemble no useful real world movement. (Ok, it would be useful if you ever had to lift a truck off you that had happened to fall on you as you lay resting on your back, but that moment is SO rare it's not worth training for.)

Yeah, but someday when that actually happens I am so going to call you and shove it in your face!!!
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