Coconut Oil and Ketosis
Coconut Oil and Ketosis , 10-06-2011 08:27 PM


Junior Low-Carber


Hello all!
I just finished day 14 of my "quasi-induction" phase. I call it "quasi-induction" since my carb intake was upwards toward 50 grams a day. I started measuring ketones in the morning on day 10 and have continued to measure in the 30-60 mg/dL range every morning since.
I was reading Dr. Newport's blog on coconut oil. She was stating that the liver converts coconut oil into ketones very readily (almost sounds like what happens when carbs convert to sugar). From reading her material, this ketone production seems to be from the coconut oil itself rather than dietary ketosis that is obtained on a very low carb diet. Right now I do about a tablespoon of coconut oil a day (doing the coffee thing - an acquired taste I must admit).
Question: How does one tell the difference between the presence of ketones from coconut oil vs. ketones from being in induction/ketosis?

As an aside, I did an n=1 diet study on myself. 2 months on a USDA recommended high carb low fat diet:
HDL=26; Triglycerides=350

This is my next n=1 diet study. 2 months on a low carb, ketogenic (hopefully) diet. Bloodwork coming next month.

Any light you can shed on the ketones vs. ketosis question I've raised will be appreciated!
RE: Coconut Oil and Ketosis , 10-07-2011 10:36 AM


Expert Low-Carber



Jimmy's take on Ketostix
I don't think there is any way to tell the difference.
Similarly I think it's possible to be in ketosis and not see a change in stick colour. I no longer bother to measure ketones. (dropped the full box down the loo while trying to test midflow and they don't work well after they've been soaked.)

I just use coconut oil to fry my breakfast and in cooking generally to replace other cooking fats/oils.
RE: Coconut Oil and Ketosis , 10-07-2011 02:20 PM


Junior Low-Carber



www.Sugaraholics.com
RE: Coconut Oil and Ketosis , 10-07-2011 02:42 PM


Expert Low-Carber


RE: Coconut Oil and Ketosis , 10-07-2011 09:00 PM


Junior Low-Carber


I think you may be wrong about this when it comes to Coconut oil that has a high percentage of MCT Medium Chain Triglycerides. You can see from the diagram below how MCT takes a short cut route so is not sent to storage while glucose is being burnt. This is why I keep saying get onto Coconut oil BEFORE you start induction so you've got the system used to burning fat.

New Insights into the Utilization of Medium-Chain Triglycerides

Fig. 1.
Metabolism of medium- and long-chain triglycerides and fatty acids by intestine, liver and adipose tissue. Abbreviations are defined within the figure. In contrast to LCT, MCT are more rapidly digested, and the resulting MCFA are more rapidly absorbed via portal circulation than the corresponding LCFA which are re-esterified and packaged into chylomicrons for lymphatic absorption. Furthermore, MCFA are predominantly oxidized, whereas LCFA may be directly deposited into adipose triglyceride stores. (Adapted from Greenberger and Skillman 1969.)

Thanks Ted. You've confirmed what I was interpreting about an MCFA like coconut oil converting to ketones very readily. I like your idea of introducing coconut oil before induction. It makes sense; getting the body use to the presence of ketones might make going into ketosis a more efficient process.

Another thought (question): Where would the balancing act be? The body is now using ketones from the CO, but in ketosis, I want the body to use ketones made from stored bodyfat. Should one discontinue CO after successfully reaching ketosis and let the body burn ketones from bodyfat exclusively? It would seem that "overdosing" on the CO might put one in the state where, yes, you are in ketosis, but you are only burning ketones from the CO, not from bodyfat.
RE: Coconut Oil and Ketosis , 10-08-2011 04:42 AM


Expert Low-Carber


Good question and I see your point.
I find that by using coconut oil as my main source of cooking fat/oil (along with butter and olive oil) my appetite is under control so I easily reach satiety and no long get food cravings so it's much easier to reduce calorie intake and reducing calorie intake allows your body to use stored calories naturally.
Medium chain triglyerides also accelerate diet-induced thermogenesis in humans so the coconut oil should also be helping your brown adipose tissue burn use surplus calories by adjusting body temperature as you sleep. Green Tea, Vitamin D, resveratrol also assist thermogenesis.
RE: Coconut Oil and Ketosis , 10-08-2011 03:17 PM


Junior Low-Carber


Good question and I see your point.
I find that by using coconut oil as my main source of cooking fat/oil (along with butter and olive oil) my appetite is under control so I easily reach satiety and no long get food cravings so it's much easier to reduce calorie intake and reducing calorie intake allows your body to use stored calories naturally.
Medium chain triglyerides also accelerate diet-induced thermogenesis in humans so the coconut oil should also be helping your brown adipose tissue burn use surplus calories by adjusting body temperature as you sleep. Green Tea, Vitamin D, resveratrol also assist thermogenesis.
Interesting stuff! Now that I am definitely in ketosis, I have to say that all of the horror stories I heard about it were somewhat unfounded. I experienced a few mental shifts, headaches, cramps on a couple of occasions, but nothing so severe that I would say it's a bad thing. Bloodwork to come in about 4 weeks; I'll post a before and after. I tested my blood sugar this morning and tested at 87 (down from 102).
Thanks for the dialogue Ted!