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Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet
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Post: #21 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-13-2011 07:44 PM


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Yes, you are right Ted, the A? may be more of a symptom than a cause. There are new things being found out all the time. When the brain lacks cholesterol (as in AD), it overcompensates by overproducing more glutamate which is very oxidative and damaging. So working on AD prevention from an anti-imflammatory angle makes sense. It sounds like getting enough cholesterol transported to the brain will prevent the AGE's from building up.
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Post: #22 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-13-2011 09:51 PM


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And here is some breaking news regarding AD:

Preliminary new blood test to detect Alzheimer's disease uncovered
February 11, 2011

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have helped develop a novel technology to diagnose Alzheimer's disease from blood samples long before symptoms appear.

This preliminary technology, which uses synthetic molecules to seek out and identify disease-specific antibodies, also could be used eventually in the development of specific biomarkers for a range of other hard-to-diagnose diseases and conditions, including Parkinson's disease and immune system-related diseases like multiple sclerosis and lupus, the researchers predict.

"One of the great challenges in treating patients with Alzheimer's disease is that once symptoms appear, it's too late. You can't un-ring the bell," said Dr. Dwight German, professor of psychiatry and an author of the paper published in the Jan. 7 edition of Cell. "If we can find a way to detect the disease in its earliest stages – before cognitive impairment begins – we might be able to stop it in its tracks by developing new treatment strategies."

Because patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) exhibit immune system activation and neurodegeneration in several brain regions, researchers in the study hypothesized that there may be numerous antibodies in the serum of affected patients that are specific to the disease and can serve as a biomarker.

Antigens – substances such as protein from a virus or bacteria that triggers an immune response – traditionally have been necessary for the discovery of antibody biomarkers. It has been impossible previously to identify an antibody (a type of targeted immune molecule) without first knowing the antigen that triggers its production.

The new study, however, challenges conventional wisdom and uses synthetic molecules (peptoids) rather than antigens to successfully detect signs of disease in patients' blood samples. These peptoids have many advantages; they can be modified easily and can be produced quickly in relatively large amounts at lower cost.

The adaptive immune system is thought to be a rich source of protein biomarkers, but diagnostically useful antibodies remain undiscovered for a large number of diseases, Dr. German said. This is, in part, because the antigens that trigger an immune response in many diseases are unknown. The technology behind this discovery is essentially an immune-system reader, which is designed to pick out antibodies without knowing in advance which ones to look for.

The researchers used a combination library of several thousand peptoids to screen serum samples from mice with multiple sclerosis-like symptoms as well as from healthy control mice. The particular peptoids that retained more antibodies from the blood samples of the diseased animals were identified as potential agents for capturing diagnostically useful molecules.

The investigators then examined serum samples from six AD patients, six healthy patients and six patients with Parkinson's. Three peptoids were identified that captured six times the IgG antibody levels in all of the Alzheimer's patients when compared to the control group or to the Parkinson's patients. Two of the peptoids were found to bind the same IgG antibody, while the third was shown to bind to different antibodies – meaning there are at least two candidate biomarkers for AD. Using an additional set of 16 normal control subjects and 10 subjects at the very early state of AD, the three candidate biomarkers identified AD with 90 percent accuracy.

"The results of this study, though preliminary, show great potential for becoming a landmark," said Dr. German.

Provided by UT Southwestern Medical Center (news : web)
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Post: #23 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-14-2011 08:06 AM


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(02-13-2011 09:51 PM)kathy Wrote:  And here is some breaking news regarding AD:
Perhap's after you've watched this series of video's of what it is like to live with an Alzheimer's diagnosis you may think it's not such a good idea.

If we were in a position to offer people with this condition a better way of dealing with it then it may be an idea but I'm not sure the pharmaceutical treatments being offered at the moment are particularly effective.

that is why we need to be reconsidering the Real Causes Of Alzheimer's Chris Masterjohn looked at this 5 yrs ago.

and and Barry Groves has also considered the matter

Continuing with a low fat, high carbohydrate diet and the using ever more powerful medications to alleviate the damage caused by removing fat and increasing inflammation does not see a way forward to me.
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Post: #24 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-14-2011 02:20 PM


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Yes, I agree totally.... that high carb low fat is probably what has caused the increase in dimentia and AD in our country. Currently, what modern medicine has to offer is dismal for AD. Prevention through diet and supplements offer more.

Ted, take a look at this study of rural South Africans, ApoE type and lipid realtionship....they also talk about AD being more of a caucasian westernized problem (diet related), especailly since there is a predominance of 3/4's and 4/4's in this area of the world.

http://sjp.sagepub.com/content/35/69_suppl/60.full.pdf
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Post: #25 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-14-2011 02:41 PM


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(02-14-2011 02:20 PM)kathy Wrote:  Ted, take a look at this study of rural South Africans, ApoE type and lipid realtionship....they also talk about AD being more of a caucasian westernized problem (diet related), especailly since there is a predominance of 3/4's and 4/4's in this area of the world.

http://sjp.sagepub.com/content/35/69_suppl/60.full.pdf
Sure it doesn't take much to work out what's going to happen when they all start eating a western style diet. Hey isn't that why we dump all our surplus grain on them and complain cause they don't want US GM rubbish. They may not want the grain but they sure will need the drugs to cope with the consequences.

The obvious point is that if it was all in the genes diabetes/CHD/Alzheimer's) then they would have high rates now. It's the diet that drive diabetes and the genes simply make some people the first to experience the consequences. We can't change our genes but we can change our diet.
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Post: #26 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-14-2011 02:52 PM


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So the biggest question is how to get cholesterol into the brain with AD. Is eating more cholesterol the solution or does it all end up in the wrong places? Is it a catch 22 since those with the Apo E4/4 allele are plaque formers in both the brain and the arteries and already have super elevated lipids? What would you do if: (1) Your father and grandmother both had heart disease, diabetes and AD...and ultimately died of these. (2) You were Apo E4/4 & type II diabetic. (3) Following a strict workout regimen with strength training and burst training. (4) Maintain a low bodyfat % and good HbcA1c. (5) Follow a strict low carb (less than 50 per day, normally closer to 30), high SF diet & your VAP looked like this:

Total LDL concentration-1826 nmol/L
Small dense LDL-1761 nmol/L
Total HDL concentration- 37 umol/L
Large HDL- 4.8 umol/L
Cholesterol Total- 192 mg/dL
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Post: #27 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-14-2011 05:13 PM


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I'm spitting out the obfuscation hook here in order to try and sum up my iron connection to dementia. Sugar eaters are placing bleaches into their brains. These bleaches cause nerve death and dementia. Low fat dieters are depriving themselves of the transporters and membrane integrity which their brains need for using iron to expel the bleaches. Ingesting healthy fats and avoiding sugar are both beneficial for avoiding dementia.

Availability of iron for removing brain bleaches is interwoven with the transport mechanisms which remove the bleaches. Inflammation from all sources, including diet and disease, causes iron shortages. The disease component of inflammation is inseparable from the diet component.

Sugar ingestion causes inflammation. Sugar ingestion damages the iron-transporting intestinal lining and grows microorganisms. The microorganisms mimic ingested "carb" lectins. The immune system reacts to both by mounting processes which cause systemic inflammation. The inflammation causes iron deficiency anemia. The anemia causes bleach buildup in cells outside the brain, exacerbating the anemia. The resulting chronic anemia denies the brain the iron needed for avoiding dementia.

It's no coincidence that celts, the ethnic tribe of people most susceptible to autoimmune disease, are more prone to iron overload. It provides an extra measure of protection against autoimmune-associated inflammation, anemia and chronic disease.

However, no one's protection exists in a vacuum. It is not a zero sum game. People exist for 1) Pleasure, and 2) Survival ......in that order. People pleasure themselves until the effects threaten their survival. Regardless of susceptibility most people push the carb and disease envelope until it threatens them. Arming oneself with the above knowledge should serve to temper people's self-pleasuring activities ....not that it will.
..
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Post: #28 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-14-2011 05:27 PM


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Ted: You posted in the low carb forum on the different effects of glucose and fructose in the brain. I copied this:

"This study provides evidence in humans that fructose and glucose elicits opposite responses in the brain..."

Can you talk about the significance of that? I don't see the connection to wieght loss.

They banned me years ago so I can't post this question there. :-)

kevin
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Post: #29 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-14-2011 09:01 PM
(This post was last modified: 02-14-2011 09:08 PM by tedhutchinson.)


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(02-14-2011 05:27 PM)chipper Wrote:  "This study provides evidence in humans that fructose and glucose elicits opposite responses in the brain..."

Can you talk about the significance of that? I don't see the connection to wieght loss.
I'm sorry I did download the paper but I haven't been able to save it. It wasn't so much about weight loss more about appetite regulation. The parts of the brain involved in impulse regulation and inhibition/impulsiveness judgement and decision making are not activated by fructose but are by glucose.

But the key sentence in the abstract "BOLD signal in the cortical control areas increased during glucose infusion (p = 0.002), corresponding with increased plasma glucose and insulin levels.
In contrast, BOLD signal decreased in the cortical control areas during fructose infusion (p = 0.006), corresponding with increases of plasma fructose and lactate"

The Examiner article on this paper is pretty reasonable. veggienft points out that Arming oneself with the above knowledge should serve to temper people's self-pleasuring activities but fructose is not activating the part of the brain associated with rational judgements and the normal process of inhibition. If the guage regulating intake isn't recording the input then it's harder to temper ones judgement particularly when the mechanism for acting on any rational judgment is switched off.
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Post: #30 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-14-2011 09:23 PM


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Thanks for the response. I think this is the url:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...131951.htm
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Post: #31 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-14-2011 09:42 PM


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(02-14-2011 09:23 PM)chipper Wrote:  Thanks for the response. I think this is the url:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...131951.htm
Yes that's the same research they are discussing in the Examiner article. A lot of people thought Lustig was overstating the differences between fructose and glucose metabolism but he is being proved right time and time again.
These are not equal partners in crime.
Fructose is even more evil than glucose.
It makes Breast cancers more aggressive
Fructose as a carbon source induces an aggressive phenotype in MDA-MB-468 breast tumor cells.

And fuel pancreatic cancer better as well.
Fructose induces transketolase flux to promote pancreatic cancer growth
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Post: #32 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-15-2011 08:21 AM
(This post was last modified: 02-15-2011 08:27 AM by tedhutchinson.)


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(02-14-2011 02:52 PM)kathy Wrote:  So the biggest question is how to get cholesterol into the brain with AD.
Ideally consuming free range omega 3 rich eggs before the onset of dementia would be the best plan but providing those with Alzheimer's with an egg rich diet can only help.
Everything older people can do to increase HDL is probably going to help cognitive function and longevity.Each 10-mg/dl increment in HDL cholesterol was associated with a 14% (HR 0.86, 0.78 to 0.96) decrease in risk of mortality before 85 years of age. In conclusion, after adjusting for other factors associated with longevity, higher HDL cholesterol levels were significantly associated with survival to 85 years of age.

Dr BG Animal Pharm has some good posts on cholesterol and good words to say about eggs

Nephropal is also on the same Paleo track Consuming those foods our DNA evolved to cope with seems a beneficial strategy at every age.

Quote: Is eating more cholesterol the solution or does it all end up in the wrong places?
I don't think cholesterol is the problem but as veggienft has pointed out OXIDATION is. So for people with a high natural anti oxidant status (vitamin d, melatonin etc etc) having a high cholesterol level isn't a problem. I have high cholesterol and I don't careHealthy Skeptic Chris Kesser.

Quote:Is it a catch 22 since those with the Apo E4/4 allele are plaque formers in both the brain and the arteries and already have super elevated lipids?
I think you best bet would be to put your question to Dr Davis in the comments following this blogpost.

Quote: What would you do if: (1) Your father and grandmother both had heart disease, diabetes and AD...and ultimately died of these.
Stay low carb and keep my vitamin d/magnesium/omega 3 status as high as possible and keep a good circadian rhythm and gut flora. These are all condtions whose incidence has increased exponentially since the introduction of higher inflammatory foods and lower natural inflammatory status.

Quote:(2) You were Apo E4/4 & type II diabetic.
same again but more strictly.

Quote: (3) Following a strict workout regimen with strength training and burst training.
As I can't exercise vigorously this is alien territory for me. Any activity that promotes inflammation will cause harm. Providing it doesn't hurt and you don't repeat any activity too often and you enjoy what you are doing have fun. If you are forcing yourself through pain your probably doing more harm than good.


Quote:(4) Maintain a low bodyfat % and good HbcA1c.
I'm not too sure about low body fat. It can be too low, Fat makes a good reservoir for surplus energy so those carrying a bit (not too much) fat often have better outcomes than the skinny folk.

Quote:(5) Follow a strict low carb (less than 50 per day, normally closer to 30), high SF diet & your VAP looked like this:

[quote]Total LDL concentration-1826 nmol/L
Small dense LDL-1761 nmol/L
Total HDL concentration- 37 umol/L
Large HDL- 4.8 umol/L
Cholesterol Total- 192 mg/dL
Why not join Dr Davis's TYP and get proper advice from a Dr who specializes in this subject. But I'd like a higher HDL number. Have I mentioned Virgin Coconut oil?
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Post: #33 RE: Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet , 02-15-2011 02:22 PM


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Hi Ted, thanks for your in depth reply! :-) I am on Dr Davis forum and am a patient of his. I have not seen him since discovering the ApoE 4/4 news. It is a state away and I will see him when the weather breaks and roads are drivable.

There is a lot of stipulation over at TYP about what diet and supplements are best for ApoE4/4. The one other person on TYP forum who has the doulbe 4 alelle is also a patient of Dr Davis and she is on a low calorie, low fat, low carb program and has a BMI of 18! Dr Davis says no coconut oil and no egg yolks at all for 4/4's and as little SF as humanly possilbe! I am just having a hard time swallowing this advise. Seems counter intuitive to me. TYP is going to have an 'official' stance regarding Apoe 4 within a few weeks. I am working on getting up my levels of vitamin D, apparently this is also a problem with this polymorphism and fat soluble nutrients. I run a fine line between overloading my kidneys and getting my D levels up. I have struggled to get into the high thirties over the past 2 years. My RBC magnesium levels were also moderatley low according to Dr Davis' scale, so I am not mega supplementing with glycinate, malate and citrate forms. As for the omega 3 status, I just had a test for that and will get results back soon, but again Dr Davis and Dr Goldstrich have cautioned me that only 500mg per day of omega 3 from fish oil for 4's. I take several forms of probiotics and prebiotics....plus eat fiber for gut flora.

Since seeing Dr Davis and joining TYP forum last September, I've been directed to decrease SF and eat unlimited amounts of veggies and nuts, avocados, seeds etc... Reduce protein, add more fats. To my already HUGE supplement list, Dr Davis added: 1,000mg niacin, K2 1,000, iodine 1,000mcg, was instructed to take 3,600mg of EPA/DHA until the discovery of 4/4, now on 500mg of DHA and one cap of krill. My vitamin D was upped to 8,000 in September, bood draw in November show a decrease in D levels. Upped to 12,000 in November and January showed only 39, now on 20,000 IU's of D. I had one bout of kidney stress so far, but was also experiencing the flu and may have been dehydrated.

All of this seems counterintuitive to me after having followed low omega 6, high omega 3, low carb (ketogenic), peleo/atkins...higher SF. The lipid profile posted above was before starting TYP, so you can see my fomer Paleo way of eating wasn't doing much good for the lipids. I am schedulled to get an NMR this month. It will be interesting to see what changes have been made in lipids. I am at least hoping for an increase in HDL.
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