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Kefir and "Yogurt Exception"
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Post: #1 Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-08-2008 03:40 PM


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I was talking to my sister about how well a low-carb lifestyle is working for me, and she said she is tempted to try it again; however, she really likes to have a Kefir smoothie each morning.

I had no idea what Kefir is, so I looked it up on Wikipedia, which says it is a fermented milk drink.

I also stumbled across an old article called the Yogurt Exception, which states:

Quote:Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates.

Has anyone used Kefir on a low-carb diet? Is the yogurt exception thing for real?

Thanks in advance!

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Post: #2 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-08-2008 03:51 PM


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kansaskyle Wrote:I was talking to my sister about how well a low-carb lifestyle is working for me, and she said she is tempted to try it again; however, she really likes to have a Kefir smoothie each morning.

I had no idea what Kefir is, so I looked it up on Wikipedia, which says it is a fermented milk drink.

I also stumbled across an old article called the Yogurt Exception, which states:

Quote:Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates.

Has anyone used Kefir on a low-carb diet? Is the yogurt exception thing for real?

Thanks in advance!

All of these are fermented or sour products. The lactose in these products which are the carbs are fermented into non-sugar end products.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kefir

It is ALL about the insulin. Everyone knows that but 'can't we all get along' Ornish. Atkins got it. Ornish doesn't have a clue.
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Post: #3 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-08-2008 03:54 PM


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kansaskyle Wrote:I was talking to my sister about how well a low-carb lifestyle is working for me, and she said she is tempted to try it again; however, she really likes to have a Kefir smoothie each morning.

I had no idea what Kefir is, so I looked it up on Wikipedia, which says it is a fermented milk drink.

I also stumbled across an old article called the Yogurt Exception, which states:

Quote:Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates.

Has anyone used Kefir on a low-carb diet? Is the yogurt exception thing for real?

Thanks in advance!

Kyle, I make kefir and yogurt at home and I count 4 grams net carbs for one half cup. I got the nutritional info from Dana Carpender's 500 low carb recipe book. Even though plain yogurt is listed as 17 carbs per serving because it is cultured the bacteria eat most of the lactose.

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Post: #4 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-08-2008 05:47 PM


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I can't seem to find kefir that is plain and unsweetened. However, I do use lebne/labne which is kefir cheese. A Lebanese friend got me hooked on using it as a dipping sauce with grilled meat. He also mixes EVOO with a dash of salt and crushed fresh garlic. Then he mixes the garlic paste with the lebne.

~Danielle

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Post: #5 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-08-2008 06:42 PM


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Noturningback Wrote:I can't seem to find kefir that is plain and unsweetened. However, I do use lebne/labne which is kefir cheese. A Lebanese friend got me hooked on using it as a dipping sauce with grilled meat. He also mixes EVOO with a dash of salt and crushed fresh garlic. Then he mixes the garlic paste with the lebne.

~Danielle


Danielle, you can join groups (in yahoogroups) of people who make kefir at home. That's how I got started. You find someone in your area who will give you starter grains or you can buy them from people in the kefir group.

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Post: #6 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-08-2008 07:24 PM


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I'm so glad to see this thread. It's been a long time since I had Kefir or Plain Yogurt, but I have to say I love them both. I look forward to hearing more info on this subject.

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Post: #7 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-10-2008 12:26 AM


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Does anyone have an opinion on lactose-reduced milk? The label on whole milk Lactaid is listed as having 12 gm CHO/cup. (I don't have any, but have seen "100% lactose free" milk, too.) Could the "yogurt exception" apply to acidophilus treated milk? If it does, wouldn't that make it even less carby than cream? Thanks for any thoughts, Michele
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Post: #8 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-10-2008 01:15 AM


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While Kefir and Yogurt are healthy foods and can be a part of a low carb diet the yogurt exception is another example of flawed study method. Dr Goldberg set his experiment to measure lactose in the final product not carbs. Since the bacteria breakdown the lactose naturally the final product did not contain as many grams of carbs as there was on the containers.

BUT during the process of making yogurt the bacteria fracture the lactose into 2 smaller sugars glucose and galactose both of which are digested by humans as sugar and neither of which were measured by Dr Goldberg.

the amount of carbs on the label are the amount of carbs in the product you consume
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Post: #9 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-10-2008 03:05 AM


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Thank you Moonius!

~Danielle

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Post: #10 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-10-2008 11:18 AM


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I make my own yogurt too. I use the Fage as a starter. I also get the unsweetened/unflavored kefir and drain like yogurt. I mix the drained kefir and drained homemade yogurt and MMMMM creamy goodness. I've seen the studies-pro and con- and believe the truth is somewhere in the middle maybe :-)
I do know one thing--its so rich you only eat about half as much. Four oz. with a few nuts and splenda is more than enough. Also very good in smoothies with a little almond milk.

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Post: #11 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-10-2008 11:36 AM


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Could one use bio-k as a starter?

~Danielle

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Post: #12 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-10-2008 01:10 PM


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2big4mysize Wrote:BUT during the process of making yogurt the bacteria fracture the lactose into 2 smaller sugars glucose and galactose both of which are digested by humans as sugar and neither of which were measured by Dr Goldberg.

the amount of carbs on the label are the amount of carbs in the product you consume.
Someone from Atkins posted this same information at LCF a few years ago. I always count the full carbs listed when I eat yogurt. For one thing, when they analyze foods they don't just add up the counts for what's in the food like we do when we use a nutritional counter. They scientifically analyze it (I have no idea how they do this) and anything that's not protein or fat gets counted as carbs. Since there is no fiber in yogurt, I would assume that what is left really should be counted as carbs. I could be wrong but at least I'm taking the safe way out.

Here's is something that I worked out for drained yogurt a while back based on information from the USDA site:

PLAIN FULL-FAT YOGURT, 2 CUPS
Calories - 277
Fat - 14.76g
Protein - 15.75
Carbs - 21.16g

After you drain off the whey, you'd end up with:

WHEY, ACID, 1 CUP
Calories - 59
Fat - .22g
Protein - 1.87g
Carbs - 12.6g

YOCHEESE, 1 CUP (2 cups yogurt with 1 cup whey drained off)
Calories - 218
Fat - 14.54g
Protein - 13.88g
Carbs - 8.56g

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Post: #13 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-10-2008 01:15 PM


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interesting was the whey acid count from the USDA cite cheese making whey acid or yogurt?
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Post: #14 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-10-2008 01:21 PM


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2big4mysize Wrote:interesting was the whey acid count from the USDA cite cheese making whey acid or yogurt?
I honestly don't know and I'm not sure if it said. I just wanted to get a rough idea of the carb count for whey and used the numbers they had posted. I think that I just did a search for "whey" if you want to check it out for yourself.

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Post: #15 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-10-2008 08:06 PM


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If you want to make your own Keifer, you don't have to join a yahoogroup. Do a search for Keifer starter. It comes in a little box that you can order online. Then you add it to milk and let it ferment in a cabinet. As you drink it the next day, save about 6 tablespoons from the original batch, put it in a clean jar, add milk and let that ferment. You can get about 7-9 jars from one packet and there are 5(?) packets in the box.

I make this all the time for my kids. Be warned though, it's bitter at first, and needs to have some splenda or whatever added. It makes wonderful smoothies!

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Post: #16 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-10-2008 09:56 PM


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Last year I was eating Greek Gods Plain Yogurt and I absolutely loved the stuff. I have backed off dairy for a while, but when I start again I will definitely buy this Greek yogurt. It is the richest, creamiest yogurt I've ever eaten and I love it.

It has only 5g carbs per 4 oz serving. Not bad at all for a really nice yogurt. I found mine at EarthFare.

Ron aka "The Former Donut Junkie"

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Post: #17 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-11-2008 01:24 AM


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LindaSue Wrote:
2big4mysize Wrote:interesting was the whey acid count from the USDA cite cheese making whey acid or yogurt?
I honestly don't know and I'm not sure if it said. I just wanted to get a rough idea of the carb count for whey and used the numbers they had posted. I think that I just did a search for "whey" if you want to check it out for yourself.


thanks cause one of the things the yogurt manufactures talked about is how the sugars are trapped in the protein matrix the acid from the bacteria creates and they are locked in so they can't make a carb free yogurt.
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Post: #18 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-11-2008 12:24 PM


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2big4mysize Wrote:thanks cause one of the things the yogurt manufactures talked about is how the sugars are trapped in the protein matrix the acid from the bacteria creates and they are locked in so they can't make a carb free yogurt.
I've noticed that what they do to make those low carb yogurts that only have about 3 carbs per container is to add a LOT of water. They're basically yogurt flavored water. I never cared for them myself.

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Post: #19 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-11-2008 06:17 PM


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KneeKnow Wrote:Does anyone have an opinion on lactose-reduced milk? The label on whole milk Lactaid is listed as having 12 gm CHO/cup. (I don't have any, but have seen "100% lactose free" milk, too.) Could the "yogurt exception" apply to acidophilus treated milk? If it does, wouldn't that make it even less carby than cream? Thanks for any thoughts, Michele

Lactaid brand milk still contains ALL the lactose it came with--they've just added lactase enzyme so lactose-intolerant people can digest it without discomfort.

Hood's Calorie Countdown brand of "dairy beverages" actually has most of the lactose removed. Unfortuntely, they've discontinued the higher fat "whole milk" variety since they changed the name from "Carb Countdown"; they now only make the 2% and skim versions. Still, I occaisionally treat myself to a carton of 2% chocolate.
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Post: #20 RE: Kefir and "Yogurt Exception" , 10-12-2008 05:42 PM


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I make my own yogurt out of raw goat's milk. In the original batch I did not use a yogurt culture or starter, I used a probiotic supplement with 10 different live bacteria strains and the natural enzymes and bacteria already present in my treasure trove of goodness, then let the sucker sit for over a day. I just finished making a batch. It sat out in a crockpot for 48 hours and the whey completely separated from the solids. It was super tangy with not a hint of anything that could even be mistaken for a sweet hint in it. I add stevia, fruit, spices, cocoa, whatever to each serving. I even mixed some of my sweetener in there with red dry wine, man it was good!
I also don't need to worry about lactose issues, since the milk was never pasteurized. In fact I can drink the stuff fresh without fermenting it and I don't have any issues. If pasteurized, oh boy, I don't feel so hot, that's for sure.
I believe that there is barely any sugar in it, probably even less than 4 g per cup. It is well beyond being any yogurt that you could buy in a store. It tastes somewhere in between super tangy butter milk and super tangy yogurt (less sweet than either of these, I would say) it reminds me of a lemon as well, Big Grin Wink
I can suck on cup after cup of that stuff, not exercise (I am NOT saying that I always do this, but hey, some days you don't feel like doing anything!), and still be in raging ketosis. Give me regular yogurt or milk and it doesn't take much to get me out.

Wyzdyx: Ever think of making yogurt with carb countdown? can you even do it with the carb content? What is the carbohydrate count?

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