Remineralizing teeth ?
Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-17-2011 06:21 PM


Advanced Low-Carber


Have you done it?
Dentists say it is not possible which is why I am doing it.
I have started doing it with calcium carbonate along with drinking plenty of yogourt and I am seeing already an improvement after 5 days or so .My teeth were almost completelly ruined by years of soda and other fast food . I have tried changing diets and eating vitamins and minerals but with no effect. I have also ordered magnesium hydroxide so I will have to see how that works. I think calcium carbonate works but together they should work better .. I just swish it around with spring water for 5 minutes .
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-17-2011 11:19 PM


Unregistered

 
I've always wondered about this. Teeth are living structures. They don't grow or regenerate, but if they just leached minerals from enamel we'd all be toothless by age 20! Then you have those enamel protecting toothpastes/washes. So it seems to me if you've worn off your enamel totally (grinding or extreme erosion like from bulimia, excessive acidic drink consumption or acid reflux) it seems remineralization is not only possible but expected.
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-18-2011 12:23 PM


Expert Low-Carber


You may want to read what
The Dental Essentials has to say on nutrition and dental health.

Stephan at Whole health source has several blogs on the topic and there are some helpful suggestions in the comments sections.

Zellies also has plenty of science based dental information while this is primarily about Xylitol it does cover other issues.
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-19-2011 11:04 AM


Advanced Low-Carber



I think teeth are the most visible markers of health and although that can be masked by modern methods of implants , it's a sort of a false security. It really is about how you treat and if you focus you can see how various foods treat the teeth. That's why yogourt and kefir is so good because supposedly it has good bacteria as well phosphorus and calcium, so I eat both aplenty now along with swishing calcium carbonate around.
I have read that I need carbon molecule to really absorb calcium into a tooth. If teeth get dissoved due to too much acid then it makes sense that alkaline minerals can restore it if you apply them hard and long enough and that's what I see now. I see it being deposited on the teeth and the ugly gaps in between are slowly closing. If I can fix my teeth than probably anyone
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-19-2011 07:35 PM


Unregistered

 

I have read that I need carbon molecule to really absorb calcium into a tooth. If teeth get dissoved due to too much acid then it makes sense that alkaline minerals can restore it if you apply them hard and long enough and that's what I see now. I see it being deposited on the teeth and the ugly gaps in between are slowly closing. If I can fix my teeth than probably anyone
There's a lot of genetics and environment at play as well. I'm blessed in this regard. Hubby, not so much, and add in the tetracycline from his youth, nothing he can do about that. Also, teeth vs. gums/bone are two different things. Ever notice how some have strong teeth but gaps at the gumline and eventually missing teeth? Others have nice anchored teeth riddled with fillings. The latter is less obvious these days with composites and porcelain crowns w/o metal. Worth doing everything we can to preserve what we got though!!
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-20-2011 02:54 PM


Advanced Low-Carber


genetics and environment have nothing to do with teeth health, this is just a straw man argument for people to become passive about their health. You can look at people around you or even read Weston Price book to know that teeth are healthy on a natural diet but the teeth get destroyed by modern acidic foods like phosphoric acid in colas and preservatives . Just look at children in Africa who have strong pearly whites and most kids in America/Europe who have tooth ache and go to the dentist, it's all about the diet.

It's all about mineralization vs unnatural acidity so in that sense if I have been exposed to these destructive acids , I need to increase mineralization in a way beyond natural foods like taking in calcium and magnesium into my mouth . Believe me once I dammaged most of my teeth, I tried eatin unprocessed foods and plenty of supplements like vitamin d, magnesium, arginine etc... but it didn't work , only when I started to put calcium and swishing around did it pick up and for the first time I am seeing real mineralization of the teeth.
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-20-2011 03:09 PM


Unregistered

 

Explain then why I have had exactly 3 cavities in my whole life, my brother had several, and my sister has a mouth full of fillings. Mom has the bad teeth (Dad trends towards the bad gums). Guess who I take after in dominant genes.
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-20-2011 05:21 PM


Advanced Low-Carber


I don't know you , why and how should I tell you ?
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-20-2011 09:41 PM


Advanced Low-Carber


FWIW, I was at my dentist just yesterday and asked him if he thought that poor teeth were inherited. He told me yes, but only because of the diets that people eat, not because they have inherited naturally bad teeth.

Susan
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-21-2011 07:42 AM


Expert Low-Carber



Susan [PDF] Dietary Carbohydrates and Dental-Systemic Diseases This paper provides some explanation as to why it's a good idea to look after your oral health.

Bear in mind that low VITAMIN D status is associated with periodontal disease so it likely keeping vitamin D status optimum improves oral health. I've not had any further fillings or bleeding gums for that matter since raising my 25(OH)D levels.

The use of Xylitol to reduce pathogenic bacteria in the mouth seems to me a sensible idea. I suspect that this will have an impact over time on levels of inflammatory pathogenic gut bacteria.

I don't understand why Xylitol isn't used more by the diabetic community. It also lowers TC, LDL and trigs.

Sugar Alcohols, Caries Incidence, and Remineralization of Caries Lesions: A Literature Review
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-21-2011 09:24 AM


Unregistered

 
@Vlado, it was a rhetorical question. @Tapper, me and my siblings ate the same diet yet developed markedly different numbers of cavities (and had similar hygiene habits too).

You can certainly improve your teeth with diet, but some are born luckier than others. One dentist once told me that all the flouride treatments in adulthood in the world wouldn't help teeth as much as flouride during the formative years.

Hmmm... when did they start flouridating water?
RE: Remineralizing teeth ? , 04-21-2011 11:09 AM


Expert Low-Carber


Fortunately the UK has for the most part escaped That neurotoxin only around 10% of our water is fluoridated but to avoid unnecessary neurotoxin exposure I use a Xylitol toothpaste that is fluoride free. There is more than sufficient fluoride in the green tea I drink but the shorter brewing time and lower water temperature do result in lower fluoride/aluminium levels