A Gym for those over 50
A Gym for those over 50 , 08-30-2008 08:28 PM


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Nifty After Fifty is a new idea in gyms, geared for those of us fifty and older. I joined in November 2007. At that time there was no committment required and the price ranged from $29.95-$69.95 per month.

This is not meant to be a commercial, it's just my personal experience.

This is a quote from their website:

[color=#008000]"The founder of Nifty after Fifty



RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 08-31-2008 04:13 AM


Moderator


Where is there a Nifty after 50 gym?? Love the idea.... I'm approaching that age, unfortunately!

Kathy in Texas
LCing is no longer a temporary fix, it's my way of life!


RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 08-31-2008 09:55 AM


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BIKINIBOUNDINTX Wrote:Where is there a Nifty after 50 gym?? Love the idea.... I'm approaching that age, unfortunately!

Hi,

Hope you aren't too upset over this, but presently there are only six locations - all in S. California. However, the company is offering franchises so there should be places opening in larger cities all over the USA.

Here is a link to their website so that you can keep up with new facilities:


Nifty After Fifty



RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 08-31-2008 11:51 AM


Moderator


No problem..... my little local gym will work just fine. The small Texas town I live in is a retirement community--- so when you go to the gym, you see MANY over 70 yrs young! They're all sweeties who love to chat and comment on my body transformation the past year.

Kathy in Texas
LCing is no longer a temporary fix, it's my way of life!


RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 08-31-2008 02:06 PM


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BIKINIBOUNDINTX Wrote:No problem..... my little local gym will work just fine. The small Texas town I live in is a retirement community--- so when you go to the gym, you see MANY over 70 yrs young! They're all sweeties who love to chat and comment on my body transformation the past year.

Kathy,

My little "Texas town" is Florence.....56 miles northwest of Austin. That's our permanent residence, but we had to come to California to get work that paid well and gave us medical benefits.

glenda



RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 08-31-2008 05:17 PM


Moderator


reluctantexan Wrote:Kathy,

My little "Texas town" is Florence.....56 miles northwest of Austin. That's our permanent residence, but we had to come to California to get work that paid well and gave us medical benefits.

glenda

I'm a native Texan.... born in Houston, lived in San Marcos and San Antonio... now living in the TX Hill Country in Kerrville-- about 45 mins outside of San Antonio. I don't think I've ever heard of Florence. Do you plan on returning back to TX or staying in CA?

Kathy in Texas
LCing is no longer a temporary fix, it's my way of life!


RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 08-31-2008 07:54 PM


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BIKINIBOUNDINTX Wrote:
reluctantexan Wrote:Kathy,

My little "Texas town" is Florence.....56 miles northwest of Austin. That's our permanent residence, but we had to come to California to get work that paid well and gave us medical benefits.

glenda

I'm a native Texan.... born in Houston, lived in San Marcos and San Antonio... now living in the TX Hill Country in Kerrville-- about 45 mins outside of San Antonio. I don't think I've ever heard of Florence. Do you plan on returning back to TX or staying in CA?

If you pass through Marble Falls and then Burnett, then toward Georgetown, Florence is on 195 on the way to Killeen. We have a house in the sticks out there with a bunch of family on it. I don't know if we'll be able to go back for retirement or not. We'll see.

I'm a graduate of Temple High School, Class of '63.



RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 08-31-2008 10:06 PM


Moderator


I just read your Bio... "I'm a performing artist, sculptor, painter, writer who also worked as a professional chef".

Who would've thought that a small town Texas girl would become so successful! Way to go! Wherever you end up.. TX, CA or Las Vegas-- hope you have a happy and healthy LC life! See ya around on the forum!

Kathy in Texas
LCing is no longer a temporary fix, it's my way of life!


RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 09-17-2008 11:46 AM


Advanced Low-Carber


A gym specifically for the older generation is a wonderful idea. When so much is taken from our seniors, this is a wonderful thing to offer back to them.

I wish I could get my mom out the door but she's become such a homebody (she's 72) it's almost frightening how different she is from the active person I remember her to be.

I'd love if there was a gym here in NY for her. I'd pay for her membership just to get her back in action.

penny
"... a work in progress ..."
back to low carbing since June 2008



RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 09-17-2008 05:16 PM


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pennypritty1 Wrote:A gym specifically for the older generation is a wonderful idea. When so much is taken from our seniors, this is a wonderful thing to offer back to them.

I wish I could get my mom out the door but she's become such a homebody (she's 72) it's almost frightening how different she is from the active person I remember her to be.

I'd love if there was a gym here in NY for her. I'd pay for her membership just to get her back in action.

I would never want anyone to think I'm making assumptions about somebody else - so please realize that I'm talking about my own experience:

I've always been a homebody myself, but my isolation increases incrementally with my depression. I've found the trip back to being active stems from my wanting to take small steps out. As time passes and I do more, I want to do more. I have a new beach cruiser bike and I've started to take short swims at 5am, even tho I'm no longer going to the gym.

My own mother is about to celebrate her 84th birthday. Her knees really should be replaced, but she's afraid the surgery would "put her down" so that she would never be able to walk again. She walks 1/4 of a mile to and from the mailbox every day. She cleans her own house and breeds poodles and pekapoos (and that includes cleaning the pens). She was my father's caregiver until his death 2 years ago. She is too stubborn to stop. Maybe I'll be like her.



RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 09-17-2008 09:13 PM


Advanced Low-Carber


reluctantexan Wrote:I would never want anyone to think I'm making assumptions about somebody else - so please realize that I'm talking about my own experience:

I've always been a homebody myself, but my isolation increases incrementally with my depression. I've found the trip back to being active stems from my wanting to take small steps out. As time passes and I do more, I want to do more. I have a new beach cruiser bike and I've started to take short swims at 5am, even tho I'm no longer going to the gym.

My own mother is about to celebrate her 84th birthday. Her knees really should be replaced, but she's afraid the surgery would "put her down" so that she would never be able to walk again. She walks 1/4 of a mile to and from the mailbox every day. She cleans her own house and breeds poodles and pekapoos (and that includes cleaning the pens). She was my father's caregiver until his death 2 years ago. She is too stubborn to stop. Maybe I'll be like her.

Understood. I'm a homebody by nature myself. I begin to wonder if my mom really is as well. I just remember her always going out and singing and with the choir traveling all over--we're church folk here. That was our club, our place to party and our life... still is but it's very different generation, but that's another story. Anyway, after reading your note, I began thinking and realize that my mom IS a homebody as well. Even when she did all the traveling, she really only went places she had to go and it was more that people gathered around her than the other way around. Hmm... maybe she really is content being home and quiet. I am a bit of a pitbull where my mom's concerned. I'll go to bat with anyone where she's concerned. Perhaps the gym isn't really what she needs but something to give her a choice to do or not. She's just used to having been around that being home sometimes gets boring, so perhaps I'm seeing that need for something to do further than it really is.

Anyway, that's wonderful your mom is celebrating 84. Time sure is flying isn't it? She sounds wonderfully active and self-sufficient you probably have to track her down. I can understand her fear of that initial need to be in one position even for that time she'd need to heal from the surgery. It's very easy to get comfortable NOT doing anything and it's almost always a challenge to make yourself move around after being sedentary... unless you have a inert drive to push you forward...

...? did that make any sense? lol

I'm a bit of an extremist. I can go either way, either too active where I exhaust myself, or so inactive I procrastinate horribly before I make a move. I just upgraded my gym membership myself today to force myself to get back in the gym. Because I told myself it was time to make things happen and it could only happen if I move.

Okay, I'm rattling on now. I'm going to stop here. lol

penny
"... a work in progress ..."
back to low carbing since June 2008



RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 09-18-2008 09:42 AM


Expert Low-Carber


pennypritty1 Wrote:
reluctantexan Wrote:I would never want anyone to think I'm making assumptions about somebody else - so please realize that I'm talking about my own experience:

I've always been a homebody myself, but my isolation increases incrementally with my depression. I've found the trip back to being active stems from my wanting to take small steps out. As time passes and I do more, I want to do more. I have a new beach cruiser bike and I've started to take short swims at 5am, even tho I'm no longer going to the gym.

My own mother is about to celebrate her 84th birthday. Her knees really should be replaced, but she's afraid the surgery would "put her down" so that she would never be able to walk again. She walks 1/4 of a mile to and from the mailbox every day. She cleans her own house and breeds poodles and pekapoos (and that includes cleaning the pens). She was my father's caregiver until his death 2 years ago. She is too stubborn to stop. Maybe I'll be like her.

Understood. I'm a homebody by nature myself. I begin to wonder if my mom really is as well. I just remember her always going out and singing and with the choir traveling all over--we're church folk here. That was our club, our place to party and our life... still is but it's very different generation, but that's another story. Anyway, after reading your note, I began thinking and realize that my mom IS a homebody as well. Even when she did all the traveling, she really only went places she had to go and it was more that people gathered around her than the other way around. Hmm... maybe she really is content being home and quiet. I am a bit of a pitbull where my mom's concerned. I'll go to bat with anyone where she's concerned. Perhaps the gym isn't really what she needs but something to give her a choice to do or not. She's just used to having been around that being home sometimes gets boring, so perhaps I'm seeing that need for something to do further than it really is.

Anyway, that's wonderful your mom is celebrating 84. Time sure is flying isn't it? She sounds wonderfully active and self-sufficient you probably have to track her down. I can understand her fear of that initial need to be in one position even for that time she'd need to heal from the surgery. It's very easy to get comfortable NOT doing anything and it's almost always a challenge to make yourself move around after being sedentary... unless you have a inert drive to push you forward...

...? did that make any sense? lol

I'm a bit of an extremist. I can go either way, either too active where I exhaust myself, or so inactive I procrastinate horribly before I make a move. I just upgraded my gym membership myself today to force myself to get back in the gym. Because I told myself it was time to make things happen and it could only happen if I move.

Okay, I'm rattling on now. I'm going to stop here. lol

I do the same thing! I exercise until I hurt myself. For instance, I've been swimming every morning and have been twinging in my right hip joint while swimming. This morning it hurts just to walk. I think I'd better take a day off.

BUT
if I take a day off, will I ever start back? Only the exercise devil knows!



RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 09-18-2008 03:49 PM


Advanced Low-Carber


reluctantexan Wrote:I do the same thing! I exercise until I hurt myself. For instance, I've been swimming every morning and have been twinging in my right hip joint while swimming. This morning it hurts just to walk. I think I'd better take a day off.

BUT
if I take a day off, will I ever start back? Only the exercise devil knows!

LOOL--exactly!!!

I'm hoping to get into swimming. I know it's an excellent form of exercise and quite enjoyable. I haven't been swimming since I was a child so I'll need to almost start over so that I don't drown!! LOL

We'll both pray the devil leaves you alone and you'll get back into swimming because you enjoy both it and the results it gives you.

penny
"... a work in progress ..."
back to low carbing since June 2008



Swimming, WAS: - RE: A Gym for those over 50 , 10-03-2008 02:34 PM


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reluctantexan Wrote:I do the same thing! I exercise until I hurt myself. For instance, I've been swimming every morning and have been twinging in my right hip joint while swimming. This morning it hurts just to walk. I think I'd better take a day off.

BUT
if I take a day off, will I ever start back? Only the exercise devil knows!

You haven't said all that much about your swimming, but although you said you used to be a water baby, you have also mentioned back and hip twinges. Swimming is said to be a safe exercise because it is not load-bearing, but it's perfectly possible for injury to arise (e.g. from the "screw kick" when doing the breast-stroke).

I wonder if you have ever heard of the Shaw Method of swimming? This is based on the philosophy of the Alexander Technique, and tries to minimise usage injuries. One of the core principles of AT is to avoid what they call "End Gaining", and concentrate on the "means wherebye". In plain English, this means forget about trying to break records, or doing large numbers of laps, and concentrate on the way you are (in this case) swimming. For example, in my old method of swimming the breast stroke, I'd have my head pinned back as much as possible (probably because of unconscious fear of the water - I only learned to swim as an adult, and the original way I learned didn't really give me water confidence). The result was that I always ended up with pains in the neck and shoulders. With the Shaw way, you concentrate on the gliding, mostly underwater (goggles help), and just come up briefly for air, without pulling the head back excessively. (There is more to it than this - this is the condensed version).

Their method for the front-crawl is also quite interesting. In contrast to the thrashing-about method of crawl I used to do (also possibly related to my private fear of the water), the Shaw method is relatively slow, although powerful, and graceful. Again, the head is mostly underwater, just turning right (not lifted up) gently, every 3 or 5 strokes or so, alternating right and left. Watching Shaw himself do this on his video/DVD is inspirational.

Note that this has absolutely nothing to do with competitive swimming, which is unfortunately the model that people are taught in school and which more often than not puts them off swimming in the long run. Shaw in "The Art of Swimming" (P123):
Stephen Shaw, "The Art of Swimming" (P123) Wrote:"The public image of swimming is shaped by what we see and read on our television screens and in the media.These are mainly competitive events in which the sole criterion of success in the water is speed. In competitive swimming, as in every other sport, records are being broken all the time. Sports science has revolutionized the way that top athletes train and swim, and human velocity in the water has increased leaps and bounds. This is part and parcel of the modern world's obsession with speed. There are no gold medals for running gracefully, or swimming freestyle in a supremely elegant way. The emphasis on speed dominates the way we think about swimming. It affects our view of swimming at all levels, as swimmers seek to emulate the style and achievement of champions.

It's not hard to see that this attitude - speed at any cost - may be inappropriate for the average swimmer. Given that we haven't developed the physical capacities that allow top athletes to exploit their natural talents under extreme conditions, not only is focussing on speed more likely to result in strain, but it's bound to distort our understanding of how to swim more enjoyably and effectively at our own level. We unconsciously absorb skilfully captured images of Olympic breaststroke sprinters pulling themselves high out of the water with every stroke. Such overexertion may be one way of helping contestants swim the breast stroke faster in their single-minded race to the end of the pool, but the cost of doing so is tremendous pressure placed on the lower back and torso..."
This is Stephen's site:

http://www.artofswimming.com/

You can also get his books and videos/DVDs here:

http://www.swimmingwithoutstress.co.uk/sws/

I don't know if the Shaw method is taught outside of the UK, but perhaps there are teachers of similar methods where you are. If not, if you can find an Alexander Technique teacher who knows how to use AT with swimming, that might be equally helpful.

Regards,
Mike



RE: Swimming, WAS: - A Gym for those over 50 , 10-03-2008 03:12 PM


Expert Low-Carber


montmorency Wrote:
reluctantexan Wrote:I do the same thing! I exercise until I hurt myself. For instance, I've been swimming every morning and have been twinging in my right hip joint while swimming. This morning it hurts just to walk. I think I'd better take a day off.

BUT
if I take a day off, will I ever start back? Only the exercise devil knows!

You haven't said all that much about your swimming, but although you said you used to be a water baby, you have also mentioned back and hip twinges. Swimming is said to be a safe exercise because it is not load-bearing, but it's perfectly possible for injury to arise (e.g. from the "screw kick" when doing the breast-stroke).

I wonder if you have ever heard of the Shaw Method of swimming? This is based on the philosophy of the Alexander Technique, and tries to minimise usage injuries. One of the core principles of AT is to avoid what they call "End Gaining", and concentrate on the "means wherebye". In plain English, this means forget about trying to break records, or doing large numbers of laps, and concentrate on the way you are (in this case) swimming. For example, in my old method of swimming the breast stroke, I'd have my head pinned back as much as possible (probably because of unconscious fear of the water - I only learned to swim as an adult, and the original way I learned didn't really give me water confidence). The result was that I always ended up with pains in the neck and shoulders. With the Shaw way, you concentrate on the gliding, mostly underwater (goggles help), and just come up briefly for air, without pulling the head back excessively. (There is more to it than this - this is the condensed version).

Their method for the front-crawl is also quite interesting. In contrast to the thrashing-about method of crawl I used to do (also possibly related to my private fear of the water), the Shaw method is relatively slow, although powerful, and graceful. Again, the head is mostly underwater, just turning right (not lifted up) gently, every 3 or 5 strokes or so, alternating right and left. Watching Shaw himself do this on his video/DVD is inspirational.

Note that this has absolutely nothing to do with competitive swimming, which is unfortunately the model that people are taught in school and which more often than not puts them off swimming in the long run. Shaw in "The Art of Swimming" (P123):
Stephen Shaw, "The Art of Swimming" (P123) Wrote:"The public image of swimming is shaped by what we see and read on our television screens and in the media.These are mainly competitive events in which the sole criterion of success in the water is speed. In competitive swimming, as in every other sport, records are being broken all the time. Sports science has revolutionized the way that top athletes train and swim, and human velocity in the water has increased leaps and bounds. This is part and parcel of the modern world's obsession with speed. There are no gold medals for running gracefully, or swimming freestyle in a supremely elegant way. The emphasis on speed dominates the way we think about swimming. It affects our view of swimming at all levels, as swimmers seek to emulate the style and achievement of champions.

It's not hard to see that this attitude - speed at any cost - may be inappropriate for the average swimmer. Given that we haven't developed the physical capacities that allow top athletes to exploit their natural talents under extreme conditions, not only is focussing on speed more likely to result in strain, but it's bound to distort our understanding of how to swim more enjoyably and effectively at our own level. We unconsciously absorb skilfully captured images of Olympic breaststroke sprinters pulling themselves high out of the water with every stroke. Such overexertion may be one way of helping contestants swim the breast stroke faster in their single-minded race to the end of the pool, but the cost of doing so is tremendous pressure placed on the lower back and torso..."
This is Stephen's site:

http://www.artofswimming.com/

You can also get his books and videos/DVDs here:

http://www.swimmingwithoutstress.co.uk/sws/

I don't know if the Shaw method is taught outside of the UK, but perhaps there are teachers of similar methods where you are. If not, if you can find an Alexander Technique teacher who knows how to use AT with swimming, that might be equally helpful.

Thank you for the input. It seems ridiculous to say, but it never occurred to me that I could just leave off the part of the swimming that was causing me pain. Good grief! Sometimes I just want to punch myself in the head