Fat to Glycerol to Glucose
Fat to Glycerol to Glucose , 08-26-2009 11:18 PM


Junior Low-Carber


! ! ! I have been pursuing a low card woe for 8 months and have maintained the same weight basically since just after the first 2 weeks. Maintain carbs at 20 grams per day. Getting desperate. Got the book The metabolism Miracle by Diane Kress. She says basically that you body will use dietary fat for energy before it will use it's own fat stores.

I'm confused. So I have done some reading online. Learning that dietary fat is turned into glycerol and then turned into glucose. So this tells me that dietary fat should be carefully controlled or at the very least you won't lose weight.

I know there are some really smart people on this discussion board and I would really appreciate any information you can share.

Thank you
RE: Fat to Glycerol to Glucose , 08-27-2009 10:23 AM


Unregistered

 

I'm confused. So I have done some reading online. Learning that dietary fat is turned into glycerol and then turned into glucose. So this tells me that dietary fat should be carefully controlled or at the very least you won't lose weight.

I know there are some really smart people on this discussion board and I would really appreciate any information you can share.

Thank you
Your body's main energy "currency" is glucose. Even if you never ingested a carb, your body makes its own glucose, and if your BG gets much below 70 you'll feel the symptoms of low BG (shaky, weak, etc.)

Fats (ingested and stored) are triglycerides. Glycerol is the small backbone connecting 3 fatty acids. Our bodies use the fatty acids for energy by oxidizing them (serially lopping off carbon fragments to form acyl CoA). For every gram of fat, the glycerol is a teeeeeeeeeny part -- kind of like the an artificial sweetener amount of grams if that makes any sense. I would not worry at all about regulating fat consumption to limit glycerol. It's the large amount of energy (9 cals/gram) that needs to be considered.

It is true that your body can and will convert that glycerol to glucose, but that's a small part of how your body makes glucose. Glucose is manufactured in the liver by a process called gluconeogenesis, and proteins (amino acids) are the primary substrates for this process. If your protein intake exceeds your needs, most of the excess is converted to glucose, and if your dietary intake exceeds your caloric needs this glucose will be converted to fat and stored. Converting protein to fat for storage requires energy expenditure so if memory serves only something like stored fat = 58% excess protein. If you're very low carb, however, you need to make sure to eat enough to meet your body's needs + a little extra for gluconeogenesis (you need this to live!) to keep BG's in normal range or else your body will break down muscle to get the amino acids it needs.

Now for the fats. Excess energy is stored in adipose tissue. This is a dynamic tissue with FA's constantly going in and out. Fat is constantly being broken down from triglyceride > 3FA's + 1 glycerol (lipolysis) and being reconstituted 3 FA's + 1 glycerol > triglyceride (lipogenesis). Some amount of fat is stored in your cells in organelles called lipid droplets. These fats are burned for energy by the cells (beta oxidation). There is somewhat of a heirarchy in how your body burns fuel -- the carbs first, so when you ingest carbs, BG's rise, insulin is secreted and pushes the glucose to the cells to be used for energy. FA oxidation in the cells is suppressed when glucose is plentiful but when glucose levels are low, FA oxidation is increase to meet energy needs. What fats get oxidized? For starters, the fats already in the cells in the lipid droplets, but as these stores are depleted they will be replenished with FA's from the blood. Those come from both dietary fats or stored fats (because there is turnover in our fat cells -- the fat in the 10 lbs gained 10 years ago is long gone even if the 10 lbs are still on your body). If your energy intake exceeds your energy needs, your body prefers to store the excess lipids because this is the most efficient. After using the carbs and excess/minimal protein for energy, your body burns the fat. If your body needs more energy than you intake, the fat comes out of your fat cells (lypolysis>lipogenesis). If you intake more energy than your body needs, the excess fats are stored. A positive energy balance is required for net fat mass gain. A negative energy balance is required for a net fat mass loss.

Bottom line, if you're not losing weight or gaining weight on LC it is because you've exhausted the small metabolic advantage (excess ketones) and are consuming equal to your current energy needs or too much. To that extent, the fat is where it's at to cut calories because you can't cut the other primary energy source much further. Consume less fat and calories and you will lose weight. I would suggest that the most painless way to do this is to cut down on added fats. As Eades suggests, cut back on the cheese and nuts because these are high energy density foods and pack a calorie punch. Another strategy is to choose leaner protein sources.
RE: Fat to Glycerol to Glucose , 08-27-2009 10:43 AM


Junior Low-Carber



I'm confused. So I have done some reading online. Learning that dietary fat is turned into glycerol and then turned into glucose. So this tells me that dietary fat should be carefully controlled or at the very least you won't lose weight.

I know there are some really smart people on this discussion board and I would really appreciate any information you can share.

Thank you
Your body's main energy "currency" is glucose. Even if you never ingested a carb, your body makes its own glucose, and if your BG gets much below 70 you'll feel the symptoms of low BG (shaky, weak, etc.)

Fats (ingested and stored) are triglycerides. Glycerol is the small backbone connecting 3 fatty acids. Our bodies use the fatty acids for energy by oxidizing them (serially lopping off carbon fragments to form acyl CoA). For every gram of fat, the glycerol is a teeeeeeeeeny part -- kind of like the an artificial sweetener amount of grams if that makes any sense. I would not worry at all about regulating fat consumption to limit glycerol. It's the large amount of energy (9 cals/gram) that needs to be considered.

It is true that your body can and will convert that glycerol to glucose, but that's a small part of how your body makes glucose. Glucose is manufactured in the liver by a process called gluconeogenesis, and proteins (amino acids) are the primary substrates for this process. If your protein intake exceeds your needs, most of the excess is converted to glucose, and if your dietary intake exceeds your caloric needs this glucose will be converted to fat and stored. Converting protein to fat for storage requires energy expenditure so if memory serves only something like stored fat = 58% excess protein. If you're very low carb, however, you need to make sure to eat enough to meet your body's needs + a little extra for gluconeogenesis (you need this to live!) to keep BG's in normal range or else your body will break down muscle to get the amino acids it needs.

Now for the fats. Excess energy is stored in adipose tissue. This is a dynamic tissue with FA's constantly going in and out. Fat is constantly being broken down from triglyceride > 3FA's + 1 glycerol (lipolysis) and being reconstituted 3 FA's + 1 glycerol > triglyceride (lipogenesis). Some amount of fat is stored in your cells in organelles called lipid droplets. These fats are burned for energy by the cells (beta oxidation). There is somewhat of a heirarchy in how your body burns fuel -- the carbs first, so when you ingest carbs, BG's rise, insulin is secreted and pushes the glucose to the cells to be used for energy. FA oxidation in the cells is suppressed when glucose is plentiful but when glucose levels are low, FA oxidation is increase to meet energy needs. What fats get oxidized? For starters, the fats already in the cells in the lipid droplets, but as these stores are depleted they will be replenished with FA's from the blood. Those come from both dietary fats or stored fats (because there is turnover in our fat cells -- the fat in the 10 lbs gained 10 years ago is long gone even if the 10 lbs are still on your body). If your energy intake exceeds your energy needs, your body prefers to store the excess lipids because this is the most efficient. After using the carbs and excess/minimal protein for energy, your body burns the fat. If your body needs more energy than you intake, the fat comes out of your fat cells (lypolysis>lipogenesis). If you intake more energy than your body needs, the excess fats are stored. A positive energy balance is required for net fat mass gain. A negative energy balance is required for a net fat mass loss.

Bottom line, if you're not losing weight or gaining weight on LC it is because you've exhausted the small metabolic advantage (excess ketones) and are consuming equal to your current energy needs or too much. To that extent, the fat is where it's at to cut calories because you can't cut the other primary energy source much further. Consume less fat and calories and you will lose weight. I would suggest that the most painless way to do this is to cut down on added fats. As Eades suggests, cut back on the cheese and nuts because these are high energy density foods and pack a calorie punch. Another strategy is to choose leaner protein sources.
That was amazing. Thank you so much!
RE: Fat to Glycerol to Glucose , 06-15-2012 03:47 PM


Newbie Low-Carber



I'm confused. So I have done some reading online. Learning that dietary fat is turned into glycerol and then turned into glucose. So this tells me that dietary fat should be carefully controlled or at the very least you won't lose weight.

I know there are some really smart people on this discussion board and I would really appreciate any information you can share.

Thank you
Your body's main energy "currency" is glucose. Even if you never ingested a carb, your body makes its own glucose, and if your BG gets much below 70 you'll feel the symptoms of low BG (shaky, weak, etc.)

Fats (ingested and stored) are triglycerides. Glycerol is the small backbone connecting 3 fatty acids. Our bodies use the fatty acids for energy by oxidizing them (serially lopping off carbon fragments to form acyl CoA). For every gram of fat, the glycerol is a teeeeeeeeeny part -- kind of like the an artificial sweetener amount of grams if that makes any sense. I would not worry at all about regulating fat consumption to limit glycerol. It's the large amount of energy (9 cals/gram) that needs to be considered.

It is true that your body can and will convert that glycerol to glucose, but that's a small part of how your body makes glucose. Glucose is manufactured in the liver by a process called gluconeogenesis, and proteins (amino acids) are the primary substrates for this process. If your protein intake exceeds your needs, most of the excess is converted to glucose, and if your dietary intake exceeds your caloric needs this glucose will be converted to fat and stored. Converting protein to fat for storage requires energy expenditure so if memory serves only something like stored fat = 58% excess protein. If you're very low carb, however, you need to make sure to eat enough to meet your body's needs + a little extra for gluconeogenesis (you need this to live!) to keep BG's in normal range or else your body will break down muscle to get the amino acids it needs.

Now for the fats. Excess energy is stored in adipose tissue. This is a dynamic tissue with FA's constantly going in and out. Fat is constantly being broken down from triglyceride > 3FA's + 1 glycerol (lipolysis) and being reconstituted 3 FA's + 1 glycerol > triglyceride (lipogenesis). Some amount of fat is stored in your cells in organelles called lipid droplets. These fats are burned for energy by the cells (beta oxidation). There is somewhat of a heirarchy in how your body burns fuel -- the carbs first, so when you ingest carbs, BG's rise, insulin is secreted and pushes the glucose to the cells to be used for energy. FA oxidation in the cells is suppressed when glucose is plentiful but when glucose levels are low, FA oxidation is increase to meet energy needs. What fats get oxidized? For starters, the fats already in the cells in the lipid droplets, but as these stores are depleted they will be replenished with FA's from the blood. Those come from both dietary fats or stored fats (because there is turnover in our fat cells -- the fat in the 10 lbs gained 10 years ago is long gone even if the 10 lbs are still on your body). If your energy intake exceeds your energy needs, your body prefers to store the excess lipids because this is the most efficient. After using the carbs and excess/minimal protein for energy, your body burns the fat. If your body needs more energy than you intake, the fat comes out of your fat cells (lypolysis>lipogenesis). If you intake more energy than your body needs, the excess fats are stored. A positive energy balance is required for net fat mass gain. A negative energy balance is required for a net fat mass loss.

Bottom line, if you're not losing weight or gaining weight on LC it is because you've exhausted the small metabolic advantage (excess ketones) and are consuming equal to your current energy needs or too much. To that extent, the fat is where it's at to cut calories because you can't cut the other primary energy source much further. Consume less fat and calories and you will lose weight. I would suggest that the most painless way to do this is to cut down on added fats. As Eades suggests, cut back on the cheese and nuts because these are high energy density foods and pack a calorie punch. Another strategy is to choose leaner protein sources.
ATP is the key to losing the fat and building your muscle. Lowering carbs and fat and you will lose muscle for energy.

Up your phosphorus intake and you will lose the fat and build proteins. ATP is required for protein folding. Raising leucine or any of the other essential amino acids is only going to pack on more fat because it is hydrophobic. It will not help you burn fat, it will help you burn your brain synapses and possibly damage neurons. Believe me I have been run around the bend with the weight loss muscle building industry. I have tried all kinds of things and not once was ATP mentioned.

I had the same problem and nothing was working until I tried Hain’s Featherweight Baking Powder. I have lost from a size 16 to almost a 12 in a short time and my energy has increased dramatically. I was not eating foods high enough in phosphorus. It is a component of ATP and without it your body will rob bone for it leading to osteoporosis. I have used an entire can already with no serious side effects so far. I know I was depleted of phosphorus.

Do not use baking powder with sodium bicarbonate in it, it will bloat you up and may affect your heart.

I read that we lose 1-3 grams of phosphorus daily so you can figure out how much you will need to consume. Twinlabs once sold a product called Phos-fuel which had me running track like a 16 year old and I was in my mid-30’s. It was that product which put me onto the phosphorus and then on to ATP. A word of warning, too much can cause kidney problems so consult a professional or better yet just eat foods highest in phosphorus. Oatmeal has a whopping 200-300 milligrams in half a cup.

Read it for yourself don't take my word for it.

Hope this helps.